Inside Swarovski for The New York Times

In a village in the Austrian Alps, Swarovski, which has been making

crystals for more than a century, is refashioning itself as a tech company.

Fearful of cheap Chinese competition and wary of a profitable complacency that has felled giants in the past — Eastman Kodak, destroyed by digital cameras, is often cited — the company is developing new crystals that double as solar panels or that change color when tapped with a finger.

Here the article:

Many thanks to photo editor Ariana McLaughlin and assistant Teo Zanin.




Mine Kafon for WIRED

I had the infinite honor of photographing a feature about afghan designer Massoud Hassani and the Mine Kafon Project.

Growing up in Afghanistan, Massoud Hassani, founder of Hassani Design BV and Mine Kafon creator, experienced the dangers of landmines first hand. After moving more than 40 times through different countries, Massoud and his family settled down in the Netherlands, where he went on to study Industrial Design at Design Academy Eindhoven.

Inspired by the homemade wind-powered toys he made during his childhood in Afghanistan, Massoud created the Mine Kafon wind-powered landmine detector for his 2011 graduation project. The project rapidly gained interest in the media and in 2012, Massoud and his brother Mahmud organised a Kickstarter campaign to raise funds for the development of the Mine Kafon as a prominent piece of landmine clearing technology.

Having undergone extensive prototyping and field testing with the support of the Dutch Ministry of Defence, Hassani Design BV’s multidisciplinary team, are now working to optimise the Mine Kafon to safely and efficiently operate across all landmine contaminated terrains.

Special thanks to the whole Mine kaftan Foundation team, David Moretti, Francesca Morosini, Massimo Pitis @ Pitis & Associati for involving me in this project and Teo Zanin for the always invaluable help.


When Machines Think – for IL

A set of images for IL Magazine, illustrating a piece by Vincenzo Latronico through logic gates built out of Lego, originally designed by Random Wraith.

These images wouldn’t have been possibile without the help of Cristiano Spiller and Edoardo Pedrotti. Many thanks to Francesco Franchi and Raffaele Vertaldi.

The article can be found here: